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ISSN: 2473-3350

Journal of Coastal Zone Management
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Journal Impact Factor 0.312* ; 0.26* (5 Year Impact Factor)
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About the Journal

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Coastal Zone Management is a process for the management of the coast using an integrated approach, regarding all aspects of the coastal zone, including geographical and political boundaries, in an attempt to achieve sustainability. It incorporates all the subjects reflecting the altering character of numerous beachfront territories, from conventional asset based lifestyles to administration based tourism and recreation lifestyles. The journal provides an Open Access platform devoted to improve coastal zone. Journal of Coastal Zone Management being an academic journal aims to cater and apportionment of the information among the people akin this expertise. This scholarly open access journal is persistent in publishing the most authentic and current trends in the precinct of discoveries & inventions. The information can be made at hand in the form of research articles, review articles, short communications etc. Open Access allows the reach of the information to its superlate level thereby encouraging and improving the element, impact and the reach of the study on a global scale. Journal of Coastal Zone Management aims to gather the relevant information with the help of Geo scientists, Oceanographers, Marine biologists, Estuarine Scientists, Coastal engineers/Ocean engineers,  Marine chemists & geo-chemists, Marine biogeochemists, Marine archaeologist, Coastal ecologists, Academicians, Farmers and Fishing communities, Corporate entities, National and International NGOs, activists, Policy makers and students to propogate the knowledge worldwide.

The journal makes use of Editorial Manager® System for quality peer-review. Editorial Manager® is an online manuscript submission, review and tracking system. The journal includes a wide range of fields in its discipline to create a platform for the authors to make their contribution towards the journal.
 
Aims and Scope

 

Coastal Dunes

Coastal dunes are U-shaped and found only in humid coastal areas and never in arid regions. They are made when the stabilizing plant cover of a linear dune is destroyed exposing the sand to the wind. The size and morphology of coastal dunes is dependent on the complex interaction between controlling winds, sediment supply and the geomorphology of the nearshore and beach environment. At the most basic level, dunes can be divided into those that form the direct supply sediment from the beach face and those that form the subsequent modification of primary dunes.

Related Journals of Coastal Dunes
Journal of Aquaculture Research & Development, Hydrology: Current Research, Fisheries and Aquaculture Journal, Journal of Marine Biology & Oceanography, Coastal dunes, Ecology of Dunes, Salt Marsh and Shingle, Lake Michigan Coastal Dunes, Landcare Research


Coastal Aquifer

Coastal aquifers are a nexus of the world's oceanic and hydrologic ecosystems and provide a water source for the more than one billion people living in coastal regions. Saltwater intrusion caused by excessive groundwater extraction is already impacting diverse regions of the globe. Synthesis studies and detailed simulations have predicted that rising sea levels could negatively impact coastal aquifers through saltwater intrusion and/or inundation of coastal regions.

Related Journals of Coastal Acqifer
Global Warming Journal Articles, Journal of Aquaculture Research & Development, Fisheries and Aquaculture Journal, Hydrology: Current Research, Journal of Fisheries & Livestock Production, Coastal Aquifer Project, Nature Climate Change, Journal of Coastal Research Online, Ground water, International Journal of Global Warming

Coastal Lagoon

Coastal lagoons form along gently sloping coasts where barrier islands or reefs can develop off-shore, and the sea-level is rising relative to the land along the shore. Coastal lagoons do not form along steep or rocky coasts, or if the range of tides is more than 4 metres. Due to the gentle slope of the coast, coastal lagoons are shallow. They are sensitive to changes in sea level due to global warming. A relative drop in sea level may leave a lagoon largely dry, while a rise in sea level may let the sea breach or destroy barrier islands, and leave reefs too deep under water to protect the lagoon. Coastal lagoons and barrier islands as a “coupled system”.

Related Journals of Coastal Lagoons
Oceanography: Open Access, Journal of Earth Science & Climatic Change, Journal of Marine Biology & Oceanography, Marine Science: Research & Development, Estuaries and Coasts, Recent Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science Journals, Coastal Lagoon - BioPublisher, Ecology and Scociety

Coastal Wetlands

Mangrove swamps are coastal wetlands. This swamp is in the Florida Everglades. Peat bogs are freshwater wetlands that develop in areas with standing water and low soil fertility. Marshes develop along the edges of rivers and lakes. Wetland types found in coastal watersheds include salt marshes, bottomland hardwood swamps, fresh marshes, mangrove swamps, and shrubby depressions known in the southeast United States as "pocosins." Coastal wetlands cover about 40 million acres and make up 38 percent of the total wetland acreage in the conterminous United States. Eighty-one percent of coastal wetlands in the conterminous United States are located in the southeast.

Related Journals of Coastal Wetlands
Journal of Aquaculture Research & Development, Fisheries and Aquaculture Journal, Poultry, Fisheries & Wildlife Sciences, Oceanography: Open Access, Wetlands Ecology and Management, Managing Coastal Wetlands - Science, Coastal Wetlands of the World, Coastal Wetlands, International Journal of Remote Sensing

Coastal Engineering

Coastal Engineering is an international medium for coastal engineers and scientists. A branch of civil engineering concerned with the planning, design, construction, and maintenance of works in the coastal zone. The purposes of these works include control of shoreline erosion, development of navigation channels and harbors, defense against flooding caused by storms, tides, and seismically generated waves (tsunamis), development of coastal recreation, and control of pollution in nearshore waters. Coastal engineering usually involves the construction of structures or the transport and possible stabilization of sand and other coastal sediments.

Related Journals of Coastal Engineering
Oceanography: Open Access, Journal of Earth Science & Climatic Change, Journal of Marine Biology & Oceanography, Marine Science: Research & Development, Coastal Engineering Journal, Journal of Waterway, Port, Coastal, and Ocean Engineering, Open Journal of Ocean and Coastal Sciences, Journal of Korean Society of Coastal and Ocean Engineers

Coastal Plain

A coastal plain is an area of flat, low-lying land adjacent to a seacoast. One of the world's largest coastal plains is located in eastern South America. An extensive, low-relief area that is bounded by the sea on one side and by a high-relief province on the landward side. Its geologic province actually extends beyond the shoreline across the continental shelf; it is linked to the stable part of a continent on the trailing edge of a plate. Typically, it has strata that dip gently and uniformly toward the sea.

Related Journals of Coastal Plain
Marine Science: Research & Development, Journal of Marine Biology & Oceanography, Journal of Earth Science & Climatic Change, Oceanography: Open Access, Coastal Plain Watershed Management, Coastal Plain Soil, Water and Plant Conservation Research, Encyclopedia of Coastal Science, Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering

Coastal Waters

Territorial waters, or a territorial sea, as defined by the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, is a belt of coastal waters extending at most 12 nautical miles from the baseline (usually the mean low-water mark) of a coastal state. Territorial waters differ from the high seas, which are common to all nations and are governed by the principle of freedom of the seas. The high seas are not subject to appropriation by persons or states but are available to everyone for navigation, exploitation of resources, and other lawful uses. The legal status of territorial waters also extends to the seabed and subsoil under them and to the airspace above them.

Related Journals of Coastal Waters
Journal of Earth Science & Climatic Change, Journal of Fisheries & Livestock Production, Journal of Marine Science: Research & Development, Fisheries and Aquaculture Journal, Water Research - Journal, Global change and eutrophication of coastal waters, Journal of Waterway, Port, Coastal, and Ocean Engineering, Estuarine, Coastal & Shelf Scienceexternal link

Coastal Geomorphology

Coastal geomorphology, is the study of the morphological development and evolution of the coast as it acts under the influence of winds, waves, currents, and sea-level changes. This study of physical processes and responses in the coastal zone is often applied in nature, but it also involves basic research to provide the fundamental understanding necessary to address the pertinent questions. A principal coastal concern today and in the foreseeable future is beach erosion. It is estimated that 70 % of the world's sandy shorelines are eroding. In the United States the percentage may approach 90 %.

Related Journals of Coastal Geomorphology
Marine Science: Research & Development, Journal of Marine Biology & Oceanography, Oceanography: Open Access, Hydrology: Current Research, Geomorphology - Journal, Journal of Coastal Research, Coastal geomorphology and restoration, Canadian Journal of Tropical Geography, Earth Surface Processes and Landforms

Coastal Mining

Coastal mining or sand mining is a practice that is used to extract sand, mainly through an open pit. However, sand is also mined from beaches, inland dunes and dredged from ocean beds and river beds. It is often used in manufacturing as an abrasive, for example, and it is used to make concrete. It is also used in cold regions to put on the roads by municipal plow trucks to help icy and snowy driving conditions, usually mixed with salt or another mixture to raise the freezing temperature of the road surface. Sand dredged from the mouths of rivers can also be used to replace eroded coastline.

Related Journals of Coastal Mining
Journal of Fisheries & Livestock Production, Journal of Marine Science: Research & Development, Marine Science: Research & Development, Journal of Marine Biology & Oceanography, Coastal mining and processes, ivory-coast - Mining Journal, Journal of Coastal Research, International Journal of Environmental Studies, Coastal Mining Journal

Beach Placers

Beach placers are a major source of ilmenite, rutile, monazite, and zircon. They have been extensively mined in India, Australia, Alaska (U.S.), and Brazil. Although there are several different types of placer deposits, the two most economically important are stream and beach placers. Beach placers form on seashores where wave action and shore currents shift materials, the lighter more rapidly than the heavier, thus concentrating them. Among the examples of beach placers are the gold deposits of Nome, Alaska; the zircon sands of Brazil and Australia; the black sands (magnetite) of Oregon and California; and the diamond-bearing marine gravels of Namaqualand, South Africa.

Related Journals of Beach Placers
Marine Science: Research & Development, Oceanography: Open Access, Journal of Marine Science: Research & Development, Fisheries and Aquaculture Journal, New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics, Journal of Coastal Research, Journal of Sedimentary Research, Ore Bin / Oregon Geology magazine / journal,  National Centre for Earth Science Studies

 

Coastal Deposition

Coastal deposition is the laying down of material on the coast by the sea. It occurs when waves lose energy or when large inputs of sediment are made into the coastal system - perhaps due to the arrival of fluvial sediment at a river estuary. Wave refraction in bays also encourages deposition due to the dispersal of wave energy. Lower-frequency constructive waves often contribute to deposition due to their strong swash, moving beach material inland. Depositional landforms can be highly vulnerable to erosion during extreme storm events unless vegetation colonisation has taken place. Plant roots can help anchor sediments, making them more resistant to the action of destructive waves.

Related Journals of Coastal Deposition
Fisheries and Aquaculture Journal, Marine Science: Research & Development, Journal of Earth Science & Climatic Change, Hydrology: Current Research, Open-Ocean Barrier Islands - Journal of Coastal Research, New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics, American Meteorological Society, The Journal of Agricultural Science, Ocean & Coastal Management - Journal

Coastal Bar/ Coastal Spit

A spit is an extended stretch of beach material that projects out to sea and is joined to the mainland at one end. Spits are formed where the prevailing wind blows at an angle to the coastline, resulting in longshore drift. An example of a spit is Spurn Head, found along the Holderness coast in Humberside. In addition to beaches, a range of unique depositional landforms exist, including the bar, spit, tombolo and cuspate foreland. The formation of these landforms additionally depends upon the process of longshore drift. This occurs when waves approach a coast-line at an angle, due to the dominant wind.

Related Journals of Coastal Spit
Marine Science: Research & Development, Journal of Earth Science & Climatic Change, Poultry, Fisheries & Wildlife Sciences, Journal of Fisheries & Livestock Production, Journal of Coastal Research Online, New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics, Brazilian Journal of Biology, Marine Geology, Rhode Island Bar Journal

Coastal Erosion

Coastal erosion is a natural process even in pristine environments. However, in areas where human activity negatively impacts the shoreline, coastal erosion can become a serious problem. Beach sand originates mainly from rivers and streams which carry it directly to the ocean. The study of erosion and sediment redistribution is called 'coastal morphodynamics'. It may be caused by hydraulic action, abrasion, impact and corrosion.

Related Journals of Coasal Erosion
Marine Science: Research & Development, Journal of Earth Science & Climatic Change, Oceanography: Open Access, Poultry, Fisheries & Wildlife Sciences, Journal of Fisheries & Livestock Production, Fisheries and Aquaculture Journal, Coastal-erosion Open Access Journals, Coastal Erosion Studies—A Review, Journal of Coastal Research, Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management, Coastal Erosion – Skara Brae

 

Beach Nourishment

Beach nourishment is the process of dumping or pumping sand from elsewhere onto an eroding shoreline to create a new beach or to widen the existing beach. Beach nourishment does not stop erosion, it simply gives the erosional forces something else to "chew on" for a while. Beach nourishment is typically part of a larger coastal defense scheme. Nourishment is typically a repetitive process, since it does not remove the physical forces that cause erosion, but simply mitigates their effects.

Related Journals of Beach Nourishment
Journal of Marine Biology & Oceanography, Poultry, Fisheries & Wildlife Sciences, Journal of Marine Science: Research & Development, Fisheries and Aquaculture Journal, Oceanography: Open Access, BioOne Online Journals, Beach Nourishment, Beach Nourishment and Protection, Advanced Series on Ocean Engineering, Sand nourishments - Deltaproof

 

Integrated Coastal Zone Management

Integrated Coastal Zone Management is a dynamic, multidisciplinary and iterative process to promote sustainable management of coastal zones. It covers the full cycle of information collection, planning, decision making, management and monitoring of implementation. ICZM uses the informed participation and cooperation of all stakeholders to assess the societal goals in a given coastal area, and to take actions towards meeting these objectives. ICZM seeks, over the long-term, to balance environmental, economic, social, cultural and recreational objectives, all within the limits set by natural dynamics.

Related Journals of Integrated Coastal Zone Management
Journal of Aquaculture Research & Development, Fisheries and Aquaculture Journal, Hydrology: Current Research, Journal of Fisheries & Livestock Production, Revista da Gestão Costeira Integrada, Journal of Integrated Coastal Zone Management, Coastal Zone Management, Coastal Zone Journal,  Integrated Coastal Zone Management - OpenChannels

Marine and Coastal Biodiversity

The oceans cover 70% of the planet’s surface area, and marine and coastal biodiversity contain diverse habitats that support an abundance of marine life. Life in our seas produces a third of the oxygen that we breathe, offers a valuable source of protein and moderates global climatic change. Some examples of marine and coastal habitats include mangrove forests; coral reefs; sea grass beds; estuaries in coastal areas; hydrothermal vents; and seamounts and soft sediments on the ocean floor a few kilometres below the surface.

Related Journals of Marine Spatial Planning
Journal of Marine Biology & Oceanography, Marine Science: Research & Development, Oceanography: Open Access, Journal of Earth Science & Climatic Change, Marine Environment Protection and Biodiversity, Journal of Coastal Conservation, Envisioning a Marine Biodiversity, International Journal of Marine Science and Ocean Technology, Research Journal of Marine Sciences

Fishery

Generally, a fishery is an entity engaged in raising or harvesting fish which is determined by some authority to be a fishery. According to the FAO, a fishery is typically defined in terms of the "people involved, species or type of fish, area of water or seabed, method of fishing, class of boats, purpose of the activities or a combination of the foregoing features". The definition often includes a combination of fish and fishers in a region, the latter fishing for similar species with similar gear types.

Related Journals of Fishery
Fisheries and Aquaculture Journal, Journal of Aquaculture Research & Development, Journal of Fisheries & Livestock Production, Poultry, Fisheries & Wildlife Sciences, Indian Journal of Fisheries, International Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Studies, Fisheries Research, Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Turkish Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Fisheries and Aquaculture Journal

 

Beach Evolution

The shoreline is where the land meets the sea and it is continually changing. Over the long term, the water is eroding the land. Beaches represent a special case, in that they exist where sand accumulated from the same processes that strip away rocky and sedimentary material. ie., they can grow as well as erode. River deltas are another exception, in that silt that erodes up river can accrete at the river's outlet and extend ocean shorelines. Catastrophic events such as tsunamis, hurricanes and storm surges accelerate beach erosion, potentially carrying away the entire sand load.

Related Journals of Beach Evolution
Oceanography: Open Access, Journal of Earth Science & Climatic Change, Journal of Marine Biology & Oceanography, Marine Science: Research & Development, Journal of Coastal Research Online, Marine Science Research Journals, Brazilian Journal of Oceanography, Journal of Waterway, Port, Coastal and Ocean Engineering

Coastal Irrigation

Water resources and irrigation infrastructure vary throughout the country. The coastal region, an arid but fertile land, has about two-thirds irrigation infrastructure due to private and public investment aimed at increasing agricultural exports. The Highlands and Amazon regions, with abundant water resources but rudimentary irrigation systems, are home to the majority, many of whom rely on subsistence or small-scale farming.

Related Journals of Coastal Irrigation
Journal of Aquaculture Research & Development, Fisheries and Aquaculture Journal, Hydrology: Current Research, Journal of Fisheries & Livestock Production, Oceanography: Open Access, Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, Journal of Coastal Life Medicine, River, Coastal and Estuarine Morphodynamics, Coastal Irrigation and Plumbing, Journal of the Geological Society of India Vulnerability, Coastal Irrigation & Landscape Management

Coastal Development

Coastal development is a broad category which includes an array of human activities including beachfront construction of homes, hotels, restaurants, and roads, often for tourism. Also included are things like beach renourishment, seawall construction, and nearshore dredging and oil platform construction. As coasts become more developed, the vulnerability component of the equation increases as there is more value at risk to the hazard.

Related Journals of Coastal Development
Marine Science: Research & Development, Marine Science: Research & Development, Journal of Fisheries & Livestock Production, Hydrology: Current Research, Journal of Coastal Development, Journal of Coastal Conservation, Ocean & Coastal Management - Journal, Encyclopedia of Coastal Science, The Coastal Journal

Coastal Ports

A port is a location on a coast or shore containing one or more harbors where ships can dock and transfer people or cargo to or from land. Port locations are selected to optimize access to land and navigable water, for commercial demand, and for shelter from wind and waves. Ports with deeper water are rarer, but can handle larger, more economical ships. Since ports throughout history handled every kind of traffic, support and storage facilities vary widely, may extend for miles, and dominate the local economy. Some ports have an important military role.

Related Journals of Coastal Ports
Marine Science: Research & Development, Journal of Marine Biology & Oceanography, Journal of Earth Science & Climatic Change, Journal of Earth Science & Climatic Change, Journal of Waterway, Port, Coastal, and Ocean Engineering, Coasts, Oceans, Ports, and Rivers Journals, Journal of Coastal Research Online, Estonian Journal of Archaeology

Coastal Region/ Coastal Area

Coastal areas are commonly defined as the interface or transition areas between land and sea, including large inland lakes. Coastal areas are diverse in function and form, dynamic and do not lend themselves well to definition by strict spatial boundaries. Unlike watersheds, there are no exact natural boundaries that unambiguously delineate coastal areas. Geologically, continental margins are of two types: active margins where the edge of a continent happens to be at the edge of an oceanic plate and inactive margins where the transition from continental lithosphere to oceanic lithosphere is within a plate rather than at a plate edge.

Related Journals of Coastal Region
Journal of Aquaculture Research & Development, Fisheries and Aquaculture Journal, Hydrology: Current Research, Journal of Fisheries & Livestock Production, The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law, Revista da Gestão Costeira Integrada, Indian Society of Coastal Agricultural Research, Bioscience, Brazilian Journal of Oceanography

 

Marine Spatial Planning

Marine spatial planning is a public process of analyzing and allocating the spatial and temporal distribution of human activities in marine areas to achieve ecological, economic, and social objectives that usually have been specified through a political process.Demand for outputs usually exceeds the capacity of marine areas to meet all of the demands simultaneously. Marine resources are “common property resources” with open or free access to users. Free access often, if not always, leads to excessive use of marine resources, e.g., over fishing, and eventual exhaustion of the resources.

Related Journals of Marine Spatial Planning
Marine Science: Research & Development, Journal of Marine Biology & Oceanography, Journal of Earth Science & Climatic Change, Oceanography: Open Access, Open channels journals, Ecological journals, Journals and Articles - Marine Spatial Planning, Marine Spatial Planning: A New Frontier?, UNESCO Marine Spatial Planning Publications

Coastal Anthropogenic Pressure

The high productivity of coastal ecosystems and the diversity of coastal biotopes account for the extraordinary abundance of natural resources in the coastal zone. Based on the classification system it is possible to distinguish the following types of coastal zone resources: foodstuffs (biological), raw materials (mineral, chemical, water), energy, recreational and health resources. Since coastal zone resources are so attractive to people shores around the world are focal points for various human activities. The principle forms of anthropogenic activity in the coastal zone are: fishing; aquaculture; coastal agriculture, forestry, hydro-technical engineering and coastal construction, mining, shipbuilding (in dockyards), oil extraction, transfer and transportation, electric power generation, cabotage (coastal navigation), seaport operation, naval operations, tourism and recreation. The sum of all these activities forms the anthropogenic pressure experienced by the coastal zone.

Related Journals of Coastal Anthropogenic Pressure
Climate Change Journals, Journal of Fisheries & Livestock Production, Journal of Marine Science: Research & Development, Hydrology: Current Research, Journal of Marine Biology & Oceanography, Canadian Geography: A Scholarly Bibliography, Brazilian Journal of Microbiology, Journal of Coastal Zone Management, Benthic Ecology and Biology: Seagrass Systems Ecology, Coastal Margin Science and Education

* 2015 Journal Impact Factor was established by dividing the number of articles published in 2013 and 2014 with the number of times they are cited in 2015 based on Google search and the Scholar Citation Index database. If 'X' is the total number of articles published in 2013 and 2014, and 'Y' is the number of times these articles were cited in indexed journals during 2015 then, impact factor = Y/X

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